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Armed Forces Members Serving Overseas use Skype to Witness the Birth of their Children

In light of Memorial Day, we’ve been thinking a lot about how military members and their families – whether they’re veterans or those on active duty – have used Skype to communicate across long distances. A recent trend has demonstrated the value of video calling for many military: the birth of a baby being witnessed via a Skype video call by deployed military members. An extremely momentous and emotional event for any family, active military members don’t have to miss out on the birth of their children with Skype.

Take for example the heartwarming story of the Scott family: when Amie Scott went to her Raleigh, North Carolina hospital on Mother’s Day to give birth without her husband by her side, technology saved the day. Through Skype video calling on a laptop, her husband Sgt. Theron Scott was able to see the birth of his son while stationed in Afghanistan. The new dad commented to FOX4 Kansas City that “being able to get on Skype and see the baby born was the closest thing that I could possibly imagine without actually being there.”

Another soldier stationed in Afghanistan, specialist Brock Howland, was also able to be by his wife’s side during his child’s birth…virtually. With the Kalamazoo, Michigan hospital’s help, Skype connected the Howland couple allowing them to be together through the whole delivery. As wife Mary Howland told their local news station WWMT News, “to have his support was the world.”

You can find out more about this amazing story in the video below:


Courtesy of KVUE.com

And finally, just last year, CafeMom reported how Skype was able to bring one couple together for their special moment even though they were in different states. Thanks to Skype video calling, U.S. soldier Cody Huckeba was able to hear the first cry of his son Dimitri as he entered the world even though the birth took place in Springfield, Oregon, and Cody was stationed in Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

We’re proud that we’re helping our troops and their families, whether we’re enabling them to chat to each other when they are apart, allowing them to see their children’s first steps or provide their little ones with words of encouragement on the first day of school.

Are you part of a military family? How has using Skype helped you keep in touch with your loved ones? Did you get married via Skype or saw your child being born via a video call? Please share your stories with us in the comments below.

2 thoughts on “Armed Forces Members Serving Overseas use Skype to Witness the Birth of their Children

  1. figgie2005 said 2 years ago

    My brother is a US Marine just returned from being deployed on a Navy Ship and in Japan got to witness the birth of his son via skype on a laptop. That was the best thing possible because this is his first son and was glad he got to experience it thanks to skype. Today is the first day he actually got to meet his son for the first time in person.

  2. thesuzanna said 2 years ago

    During the first 9 weeks of my relationship with my boyfriend, Skype played a huge role. I met my boyfriend during his holiday block leave (HBL) in December, and we couldn’t get enough of each other. We exchanged FB information, but after a while, messages weren’t enough. We added each other on Skype and eventually we took every opportunity we could to call and video message each other. Being able to see his face and hear his voice was all I needed to get through our 9 weeks apart. It made falling in love 3,000 miles apart easier than I could’ve imagined. I’m lucky enough to have him here with me until he goes active duty. Thanks to Skype for helping me get to know and love this amazing man.

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